How to compliment to somebody in Italian

If you want to compliment someone on their achievements, you can say: (Che) Bravo! Good job! Bravissimo! Excellent job! If you want to compliment somebody in the specific circumstances like a wedding or graduation or a promotion at work, you can easily say: Congratulazioni! Congratulations! Complimenti! Congratulations! You might want to add depending on the context:[…]

Fermare & Smettere: what’s the difference?

I often notice my students misusing the verbs fermare and smettere, and I understand that the confusion comes from the fact that both verbs are translated into English with to stop. In Italian fermare and smettere are used differently, depending on the nature of the action they are stopping. Let’s see how to use them[…]

Using the Italian adjectives BELLO & QUELLO

Everybody knows that quello means ‘that’ and bello means ‘nice or beautiful,’ however now and then you might have read or listened to the forms ‘quegli/begli’, quei/bei, quel/bel. How come? Let’s start from quello You should be able to distinguish when quello is used as a pronoun (replacing a noun) and when used as adjective[…]

How to express positive emotions in Italian

Italians have a reputation to be emotional and sentimental, and this is entirely right. No need to say, we like to express positive and (negative) emotions with friends and family and we do it often. Have you ever wondered what the most common ways to say in Italian ‘Well Done‘ or ‘I was happy about..‘[…]

How to use in Italian ECCO & CIOE’

Ecco and cioè are Italian adverbs that Italians use all the time. Hard to translate into English, they will come in handy when you travel to Italian or speak with you Italian friends. Here is a list of how and when to use them. Buona lettura! Ecco It describes the appearance of something or somebody,[…]

FIVE ITALIAN PROVERBS ABOUT LOVE

  L’amore non è bello, se non è litigarello There is no equivalent in English, altough I found out that Shakespeare would have said ‘The course of true love never did run smooth‘. The above Italian proverb pretends to ease the tension after a little quarrel by objecting that a relationship can’t be completely ‘bella’ (or[…]

Compunds verbs: auxiliary Essere o Avere?

Tenses are normally divided into simple and compound ones, the letter result from the union of the past participle and the conjugated form of the verb essere (to be) or avere (to have). Many students have come to be with doubts concerning the use of the one or the other auxiliary. Although it might sound[…]

Come usare il verbo “VENIRE”

Venire is one of the most used verbs in Italian, however, I always notice during my classes that many learners of Italian tend to mix up the verbs venire and andare and I guess this is happening because in English the difference is not as clear as in Italian. Venire means “to come”, but more specifically, it means moving and[…]