How to compliment to somebody in Italian

If you want to compliment someone on their achievements, you can say: (Che) Bravo! Good job! Bravissimo! Excellent job! If you want to compliment somebody in the specific circumstances like a wedding or graduation or a promotion at work, you can easily say: Congratulazioni! Congratulations! Complimenti! Congratulations! You might want to add depending on the context:[…]

Using the Italian adjectives BELLO & QUELLO

Everybody knows that quello means ‘that’ and bello means ‘nice or beautiful,’ however now and then you might have read or listened to the forms ‘quegli/begli’, quei/bei, quel/bel. How come? Let’s start from quello You should be able to distinguish when quello is used as a pronoun (replacing a noun) and when used as adjective[…]

5 things you need to know about Possessives in Italian

1. Key differences with English In English possessives are never used with articles. However, in Italian, they are always accompanied with articles (except for some cases discussed below). The possessive agrees in gender and number with the nouns they are proceeding la mia borsa il mio libro la sua ragazza il suo lavoro 2. When are the[…]

Fare bene & fare male: how to use them

In this article, I will explain how to use two expressions with the verb fare which are often used in spoken Italian to show approval or disapproval towards something: fare bene & fare male Fare bene expresses approval or satisfaction towards somebody. For example, a friend tells you that he quit his job because could[…]

How to express positive emotions in Italian

Italians have a reputation to be emotional and sentimental, and this is entirely right. No need to say, we like to express positive and (negative) emotions with friends and family and we do it often. Have you ever wondered what the most common ways to say in Italian ‘Well Done‘ or ‘I was happy about..‘[…]

12 Latin words (and sentences) used in spoken Italian

By most measures, in the Romance language family, Italian is the closest language to Latin. Many Latin words and even some entire Latin phrases have become so naturalized in Italian that we use them, in full, without a second thought. By learning them your Italian will sound more natural and fancier. Idem Exclamation meaning ‘same[…]

GIORNO and GIORNATA: how to use them

Today I decided to write about something that I am very often asked by my students: the difference between the words giorno e giornata  and how to use them. Giorno and giornata are essentially synonyms, with slight differences of usage. Giornata is used when referring to the approximate duration of the day from morning to[…]

Espressioni con ESSERE & AVERE

In Italian there is a certain amount of popular expressions that use the verb avere when English uses the verb essere and viceversa. Below I wrote a list of the most popular ones. AVERE avere sonno: to be sleepy avere fame: to be hungry avere sete: to be thirsty avere freddo: to be cold avere[…]

Top 10 most frequent irregual verbs in Italian

Many important verbs of the present tense are irregular: it means that they do not follow the regular pattern when it comes to conjugate them. The following list shows the top 10 most frequent irregular verbs in Italian. They happen to be very important and much used verbs, therefore you’d better master them in order[…]

5 most common mistakes beginners make when speaking Italian

Here is a list of the 5 most common grammatical mistakes that beginners/intermediate students tend to make when speaking Italian. 1- The use of the definite masculine articles  IL – LO and I – GLI. LO is used instead of IL before singular nouns starting with s + consonant, ps, gn, x, y, z. GLI is used instead[…]

RICETTA: COME FARE UN CAPPUCCINO IN CASA!

Il cappuccino è una bevanda calda italiana al gusto di caffè, a base di espresso e latte caldo. Spesso viene servito nei bar con una spolverata di cacao amaro o cannella. La bevanda prende il nome dai frati Cappuccini e fa riferimento al colore dei loro abiti. In Italia, il cappuccino si beve solitamente solo[…]

FIVE ITALIAN PROVERBS ABOUT LOVE

  L’amore non è bello, se non è litigarello There is no equivalent in English, altough I found out that Shakespeare would have said ‘The course of true love never did run smooth‘. The above Italian proverb pretends to ease the tension after a little quarrel by objecting that a relationship can’t be completely ‘bella’ (or[…]

23 ways to use the verb “FARE”

Other than being an irregular verb, FARE is used in Italian in a number of many useful expressions. Let’s see some of them: Fare i compiti: to do the homework Fare le pulizie: to do the cleanings Fare un biglietto: to buy a ticket Fare una passeggiata: to go for a walk Fare un giro:[…]

LET’S GO FOR A WALK IN ITALIAN

In Italian there is more then one way to say  to go for a walk,  have you already heard all of them? Fare una passeggiata. Ehi, ti va di fare una passeggiata in collina? Fare due passi (o fare quattro passi). Maria, andiamo a fare due passi in spiaggia dai! Fare un giro (a piedi). Mamma,[…]