How to compliment to somebody in Italian

If you want to compliment someone on their achievements, you can say: (Che) Bravo! Good job! Bravissimo! Excellent job! If you want to compliment somebody in the specific circumstances like a wedding or graduation or a promotion at work, you can easily say: Congratulazioni! Congratulations! Complimenti! Congratulations! You might want to add depending on the context:[…]

Fermare & Smettere: what’s the difference?

I often notice my students misusing the verbs fermare and smettere, and I understand that the confusion comes from the fact that both verbs are translated into English with to stop. In Italian fermare and smettere are used differently, depending on the nature of the action they are stopping. Let’s see how to use them[…]

Using the Italian adjectives BELLO & QUELLO

Everybody knows that quello means ‘that’ and bello means ‘nice or beautiful,’ however now and then you might have read or listened to the forms ‘quegli/begli’, quei/bei, quel/bel. How come? Let’s start from quello You should be able to distinguish when quello is used as a pronoun (replacing a noun) and when used as adjective[…]

5 things you need to know about Possessives in Italian

1. Key differences with English In English possessives are never used with articles. However, in Italian, they are always accompanied with articles (except for some cases discussed below). The possessive agrees in gender and number with the nouns they are proceeding la mia borsa il mio libro la sua ragazza il suo lavoro 2. When are the[…]

How to find the perfect online Italian tutor

I love learning languages solo, or at least I used to be. These days with my busy schedule I find it harder and harder finding the time and the focus to concentrate on language learning on my own. Currently, I have been studying Portuguese and Russian and hiring online tutors for both languages. The main[…]

Lì or là? Qui or Qua? The difference

What’s the difference between là and lì? Qui and qua? Many times I am asked during my Italian online lessons if there is any difference between the two of them, well there is, even tough is a small one. Both là and lì means there and are indicating something that is far from the person[…]

How to use in Italian ECCO & CIOE’

Ecco and cioè are Italian adverbs that Italians use all the time. Hard to translate into English, they will come in handy when you travel to Italian or speak with you Italian friends. Here is a list of how and when to use them. Buona lettura! Ecco It describes the appearance of something or somebody,[…]

5 ways to use the Italian word PROPRIO

1. As an adverb (invariable form) As ad adverb, proprio, means ‘really’ Quello studente é proprio bravo! Mi piace proprio il nuovo film di Sorrentino And sometimes it means ‘just’, often combined with the adverbs of time (adesso, ora ) or a numeral adjective. Ho finito di cenare proprio adesso Maria mi ha chiamato proprio[…]

GIORNO and GIORNATA: how to use them

Today I decided to write about something that I am very often asked by my students: the difference between the words giorno e giornata  and how to use them. Giorno and giornata are essentially synonyms, with slight differences of usage. Giornata is used when referring to the approximate duration of the day from morning to[…]

6 Great Texbooks to expand your Italian Vocabulary

Have you ever wondered why building an extensive vocabulary is so important and which are the best textbooks to improve your Italian vocabulary? Words are one of the most important tools to facilitate and empower communication.  Since vocabulary is so important, it is wise to extend the size of your vocabulary whenever you can. A[…]

Canzoni Italiane: Vita Spericolata di Vasco Rossi (livello A2)

Vita spericolata è una  famose canzone scritta da Vasco Rossi  e  presentata per la prima volta nel 1983 al XXXIII Festival di Sanremo (Festival della Canzone Italiana) È una delle canzoni italiane più conosciute dai giovani italiani e una delle canzoni più rappresentative del rock italiano. Il brano, nella sua prima stesura, doveva essere  dedicato ad[…]

Valentine’s day post:14 names Italian use between lovers

As Valentine’s day is approaching I thought about listing the most popular names that Italians use between lovers (and in same cases between close friends). The listing is accompained with the literal English translation, however all of the followings might sound in English like darling, sweetheart, honey and the likes.   Tesoro (and the abbreviation[…]

5 modi di dire con la parola ‘punto’.

Punto means point .However when combined with some verbs or other words can take a whole different meaning. These five collocations will surely make your Italian more sofisticated when used!   Mettere a punto means either to develop or finalize a project or to define a question. IBM ha messo a punto un nuovo super computer[…]

Espressioni con ESSERE & AVERE

In Italian there is a certain amount of popular expressions that use the verb avere when English uses the verb essere and viceversa. Below I wrote a list of the most popular ones. AVERE avere sonno: to be sleepy avere fame: to be hungry avere sete: to be thirsty avere freddo: to be cold avere[…]