How to compliment to somebody in Italian

If you want to compliment someone on their achievements, you can say: (Che) Bravo! Good job! Bravissimo! Excellent job! If you want to compliment somebody in the specific circumstances like a wedding or graduation or a promotion at work, you can easily say: Congratulazioni! Congratulations! Complimenti! Congratulations! You might want to add depending on the context:[…]

Using the Italian adjectives BELLO & QUELLO

Everybody knows that quello means ‘that’ and bello means ‘nice or beautiful,’ however now and then you might have read or listened to the forms ‘quegli/begli’, quei/bei, quel/bel. How come? Let’s start from quello You should be able to distinguish when quello is used as a pronoun (replacing a noun) and when used as adjective[…]

Fare bene & fare male: how to use them

In this article, I will explain how to use two expressions with the verb fare which are often used in spoken Italian to show approval or disapproval towards something: fare bene & fare male Fare bene expresses approval or satisfaction towards somebody. For example, a friend tells you that he quit his job because could[…]

How to use in Italian ECCO & CIOE’

Ecco and cioè are Italian adverbs that Italians use all the time. Hard to translate into English, they will come in handy when you travel to Italian or speak with you Italian friends. Here is a list of how and when to use them. Buona lettura! Ecco It describes the appearance of something or somebody,[…]

HOW TO USE THE ITALIAN VERB METTERSI

Mettersi is an Italian verb verbs that a non-native speaker might find difficult to use. However it is widely used in the spoken Italian and you must want know how to use it. First things first, the verb  mettersi is a reflexive  verbs and when it appears in a compound verb, e.g. passato prossimo the[…]

10 useful Italian expressions you will not find in textbooks

No matter you are new to the beauty of the Italian language or you have already spent several years  studying it,  these 10 useful slang expressions,  you would hardly find in a textbook of Italian, will help you to speak Italian more like a native than ever before.   1.Va bene  Va bene is the italianization[…]

FIVE ITALIAN PROVERBS ABOUT LOVE

  L’amore non è bello, se non è litigarello There is no equivalent in English, altough I found out that Shakespeare would have said ‘The course of true love never did run smooth‘. The above Italian proverb pretends to ease the tension after a little quarrel by objecting that a relationship can’t be completely ‘bella’ (or[…]

Compunds verbs: auxiliary Essere o Avere?

Tenses are normally divided into simple and compound ones, the letter result from the union of the past participle and the conjugated form of the verb essere (to be) or avere (to have). Many students have come to be with doubts concerning the use of the one or the other auxiliary. Although it might sound[…]