7 ways to say ”you’re welcome” in Italian

How many different ways do you know to say “you’re welcome” in Italian? 

If you think prego is the most common, you might be surprised to learn that there are six other ways to say it.

Check out the list below for more tips on how to be more pleasant and natural when speaking Italian.

1. Prego

Prego is the easiest and most popular way to say you’re welcome in Italian. Besides meaning you are welcome, prego also means please in some contexts and is the first person singular of the present tense of the verb pregare (to pray).

– Grazie per il tuo aiuto!

– Prego!

2. Di niente

Di niente is as much used as prego, andit means nothing.

– Grazie per il tuo aiuto!

– Di niente!

3. Figurati! / Si figuri!

Figurati (used in an informal setting ) and Si figuri (used in a formal setting) stand for “don’t mention it

– Grazie per il tuo aiuto!

– Figurati! / Si figuri!

4. Non c’è di che

Non c’è di che means’ don’t say/mention it! and gives the idea that you did what you were thanked for with pleasure.

– Grazie per il tuo aiuto!

– Non c’è di che

5. Non c’è problema

Non c’è problema” means no problem at all’.

– Grazie per il tuo aiuto!

– Non c’è problema!

6. E di che?

E di che?  means, literally, what are you thanking me for? and it’s used only in informal settings.

– Grazie per il tuo aiuto!

– E di che?

7. Ci mancherebbe altro!

Ci mancherebbe altro! means ‘of course, obviously’. You can use it when you do a favor to somebody and he or she is very thankful for that. In short, ‘ci mancherebbe altro’ means something like ‘I did it with pleasure, don’t mention it!”

– Grazie per il tuo aiuto!

– Ci mancherebbe altro!

BONUS: when PREGO means “please” or “can you repeat?

Prego is also used when it has a different meaning in Italian than you’re welcome.

When “prego” means “please

For example, if you’re standing in line at a cash register and  somone says “prego,” it means “you first, after you,” or if you’re on crowded public transportation and want to let someone pass you by at the exit door, you can say “prego” to the person. 

In short, depending on the situation, PREGO means also please, after you, you first 

When “prego” means “can you repeat?”

when prego is used in a question, like prego? is a polite way to say “Can you repeat?” or “Come again”

About the Author

Serena Capilli

I’m the creative force behind both this blog and my collection of short stories in simple Italian for language learners, available on Amazon.

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Ciao, I'm Serena!

I’m the creative force behind both this blog and my collection of short stories in simple Italian for language learners, available on Amazon.

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