Italian Language Foundations

Italian Basics 

They say you can’t build a great building on a weak foundation. I tell you can’t become a fluent Italian speaker on weak foundations. That’s why I am gathering on this page my best articles for beginners learners of Italian (the page is not under construction yet).
Some students are scared by grammar.

Instead, I say to my students that knowing a little grammar can be a fantastic shortcut to optimal Italian fluency.

Why memorize words, sentences, or even whole dialogues if you can learn one rule and apply it endless times?
That’s all it takes to become undefended and smart Italian language learners. 

Italian Passato Prossimo

Italian Passato Prossimo

What is passato prossimo in Italian?  Passato prossimo is the main past tense in Italian and is used to express actions and events that occurred in the past.  Usually, it appears together with time expressions such as ieri - yesterday  stamattina - this...

Direct Object Pronouns in Italian: An Easy Guide

Direct Object Pronouns in Italian: An Easy Guide

What's a pronoun?  Pronouns are an essential part of speech that allow us to replace something that has already been said and avoid repeating ourselves. Pronouns are widely used in conversation as they help us to be more concise and speak faster. Italian, just...

Italian Noun Gender. Determining Masculine vs. Feminine

Italian Noun Gender. Determining Masculine vs. Feminine

Nouns ending in '-o' or '-a'  In Italian language, nouns, pronouns, and adjectives can be assigned one of two grammatical genders: masculine or feminine. The gender of a word is arbitrary and does not always have a logical connection to the gender of the person or...

Italian Prepositions: How To Use ‘In’ and ‘A’

Italian Prepositions: How To Use ‘In’ and ‘A’

One of the most common mistakes in Italian (for foreign learners) concerns the use of the preposition a and in. And it is totally normal. In fact, in some cases, specific rules are telling you how to use the preposition in and when using the...

Italian Impersonal Form

Italian Impersonal Form

In Italian, we have a simple way to make a generalization or to make a sentence where the subject is not specified: the impersonal form. The impersonal form is made up by: si + any verb conjugated in the 3rd person singular Example: In Italia, si mangia bene.In Italy,...

Common expressions using ESSERE and AVERE

Common expressions using ESSERE and AVERE

In Italian, the verbs essere and avere are certainly amongst the most popular ones. This is why they are widely used in many common Italian idiomatic expressions like the one following. Bear in mind that a certain number of recurring expressions use the...

The Verb ‘Piacere’ in Italian: A Simple Guide

The Verb ‘Piacere’ in Italian: A Simple Guide

Mi piace or non piace are verbs Italians use all the time.  Ti piacciono quelle scarpe? - Do you like those shoes?  Non ci è piaciuto quel film - We didn't like that movie Ti piace la cucina italiana? - Do you like...

The Polite Form in Italian: Formal and Informal You

The Polite Form in Italian: Formal and Informal You

Italian, like many other languages, has different forms of address that reflect the level of formality in a given situation. The use of "tu" is informal, and it's typically used between friends, family members, or close acquaintances. On the other hand, when...

Italian Definite Articles (Articoli Determinativi)

Italian Definite Articles (Articoli Determinativi)

Building solid foundations is key in every foreign language you learn. Mastering the nitty-gritty of the basics will be your pathway to fluency, I promise. That’s why today we’ll cover the Italian definite articles (gli articoli determinativi) and especially when...

Most Used ‘-ISC’ Verbs in Italian

Most Used ‘-ISC’ Verbs in Italian

As you already know, there are three groups of verbs. 1st (-ARE verbs)cucinareto cookmangiare, studiare, guardare2nd (-ERE verbs)scrivereto writeleggere, vedere, vincere3rd (-IRE) verbs)dormireto sleepaprire, partire, finireItalian verb groups Most of the "ire" verbs...