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Italian Impersonal Form

Italian Impersonal Form

The impersonal form with "si" In Italian, we have a simple way to make a generalization or to make a sentence where the subject is not specified: the impersonal form. The impersonal form is made up by: si + any verb conjugated in the 3rd person singular. Example: In...

Common expressions using ESSERE and AVERE

Common expressions using ESSERE and AVERE

In Italian, the verbs essere and avere are certainly amongst the most popular ones. This is why they are widely used in many common Italian idiomatic expressions like the one following. Bear in mind that a certain number of recurring expressions use the...

PLIDA B1: The Structure.

PLIDA B1: The Structure.

What's the PLIDA Exam? The P.L.I.D.A (Progetto Lingua Italiana Dante Alighieri) is an Italian exam created by the Italian Ministry of Education to test language proficiency at different levels in Italian. It’s intended for people who don’t live or study Italian...

Expressing Positive Emotions in Italian

Expressing Positive Emotions in Italian

Italians have a reputation for being emotional and sentimental, and this is entirely right. No need to say, we like to express positive and (negative) emotions with friends and family, and we do it often. Have you ever wondered what the most common ways to say in...

B1 Cils Cittadinanza: How to Prepare for the Speaking Part 

B1 Cils Cittadinanza: How to Prepare for the Speaking Part 

This article aims to dispel any doubts and help you succeed in the speaking part of the Cils B1 Citizenship test.  As you are aware, the Citizenship exam also includes reading, listening, grammar, and writing sections; however, many students find the speaking...

The Preposition ‘Da’: How to Use It

The Preposition ‘Da’: How to Use It

Most of the time, the Italian preposition "da" means "from," but it can also mean "since/for," "to," "at," and other things. Yes, it sounds difficult because prepositions in English and Italian do not have a binary correspondence. That is why, in my classes, I always...

Italian Comparatives: using ‘che’ or ‘di’

Italian Comparatives: using ‘che’ or ‘di’

What's a 'comparative' in Italian? The Italian comparatives express how to say more then, less than, the same as. We call this comparativo di maggioranza:  La casa di Maria è più grande di quella di Lucia - Maria's house is bigger than Lucia's ...

Dovere, avere bisogno, servire, bisogna: The Difference

Dovere, avere bisogno, servire, bisogna: The Difference

In this post, I want to discuss the differences between three Italian verbs that are often confused. Each of them expresses a need in English. However, they are used in different contexts and are not interchangeable.  What’s the difference between dovere,...

49 Italian Words and Phrases for Cooking

49 Italian Words and Phrases for Cooking

The kitchen in Italy is, without any doubts, the most favorite room in an Italian household. Having a big, bright and fully-equipped kitchen is the dream of every one of us! Why so? The kitchen for Italians is not just a place where you get some food ready and run...